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Cache Creek, British Columbia (Canada)

Thompson-Nicola Regional District

Last modified: 2016-07-28 by rob raeside
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[Cache Creek flag] image contributed by Ivan Sache, 6 January 2007


See also:


Description of the flag

From the Municipal website:

The bustling town of Cache Creek is located at the Junction of the Trans Canada Highway and Highway #97. It is situated on the Thompson Plateau at the junction of the Cariboo and Thompson Valleys, which help to form the Interior Plateau. And, like the areas surrounding it, Cache Creek also offers a variety of terrain. The Bonaparte River runs through Cache Creek and above the deep valley of the river lies rolling grasslands which give way to surrounding hills covered in sagebrush and cactus. Above the rolling desert hills lie beautiful mountainous terrain.

During the gold rush of the mid 1800's, Cache Creek served as a halfway point for many hopeful prospectors en route to the Cariboo Gold Fields. Today, travelers can follow the Historic Gold Rush Trail and Cache Creek still remains an excellent halfway stop.

Cache Creek offers many point of interest for the weary traveler, and sporting a population of approximately 1200 residents, they also offer a full list of community and recreational activities.

(a more detailed historical account can be read on the website)

The 100 Mile House Free Press, 3 January 2007, reports:

Mayor Donna Barnett came to work the first day of 2007 only to find Cache Creeks flag blowing in the 100 Mile wind. Our southern neighbour won the mayoral bet in ICBCs October Zero Crash Month and, as a result, their colours will fly outside council chambers for the next month. The 100 Mile House flag is flying in Clinton.

A picture shows the Mayor and the flag, unfortunately for the sake of vexillology focused on the Mayor. The flag of Cache Creek seems to portray a landscape with lettering above it, most probably the name of the municipality.

Zero Crash Month is a province-wide competition organized by ICBC that challenges communities to reduce vehicle crashes and road-related harm. I understand that there were bets among neighbouring municipalities and that the winner's flag was flown over the loser's city hall. This is a good opportunity to see local flags (and to identify them wrongly!)

Ivan Sache, 6 January 2007