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Salzgitter City (Germany)

Stadt Salzgitter, Lower Saxony

Last modified: 2019-06-21 by klaus-michael schneider
Keywords: salzgitter | bad(salzgitter) | beddingen | bleckenstedt | calbecht | lesse | reppner | thiede | uefingen | salt-hook | furnace | hammer and mallet | globe | bulrush | crown(agricultural) | lozenge(embattled) | linden |
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[Salzgitter city flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 27 Aug 2007

See also:

Salzgitter City

Introduction of Salzgitter

The nowadays city of Salzgitter has seven districts, named by geographic directions and has in total 31 boroughs. The city was established in 1942 by a merger of 28 of these settlement cores. Sauingen was incorporated later in 1974. The city had a bit more than 107,000 inhabitants in 2018. The biggest settlement cores are Lebenstedt (more than 45,000 inhabitants) and Bad (more than 21,000 inhabitants), which developed near the small village (today borough) of Gitter, which had been some kind of name giver for the new city.
Lebenstedt had been a small village, until in 1937 a great iron processing factory had been built and many workers settled down here.
Bad developed near a brine spring, the saline of Salzliebenhalle, which produced salt since the 12th century around the villages of Gitter, Kniestedt and Vepstedt. Salines had been there before already since the 7th century. In 1350 the local farmers gained city rights from the Bishops of Hildesheim. Those were lost at the beginning of the 16th century under the rule of the Dukes of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel, regained in 1803 by Prussia and lost again in 1815 by the Kings of Hannover. Although the Bishops of Hildesheim granted city rights again, the salines remained a privat property of the Dukes of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel. As a result the people of Salzgitter and the city became impoverished within these struggles, and many craftsmen, especially linen weavers, potters, tailors and shoemakers lost their jobs. Being out of work since 1780 they formed Klesmer bands, a special form of musicians, led by a chief of a family. Those musicians travelled all over the world between 1815 and 1906. In 1830 the settlement gained the title of a spa and the name Salzgitter-Bad was introduced. In 1866 it became a possession of Prussia again, which granted city rights anew in 1929 after the municipalities of Vorsalz (1926) and Liebenhalle (1928) had been incorporated. Kniestedt was added in 1938.
Lebenstedt and Bad were united with the surrounding smaller villages from the counties of Goslar (belonging to Hannover) and Wolfenbüttel (belonging to Braunschweig), in order to push the industrial structure of iron processing. The newly formed city was named Watenstedt-Salzgitter, since 1951 simply Salzgitter.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

Salzgitter Flag

The flag is white, bordered by two red horizontal stripes, the arms on the white stripe.
Sources: this online catalogue; Stadler 1970, p.69; and Staack1997
Stefan Schwoon, 21 Feb 2001

Salzgitter Banner

[Salzgitter city banner] image by Jörg Majewski, 27 Aug 2007

The flag is white, bordered by two red vertical stripes, the arms on the white stripe.
Sources: Stadler 1970, p.69; and this online catalogue
Stefan Schwoon, 21 Feb 2001

Salzgitter Coat of Arms

[Salzgitter CoA] image by Jörg Majewski, 27 Aug 2007

Shield Gules, issuant from base a mural wall Argent masoned Sable, topped by a furnace of the same, flanked by two grain ears Or in pale, the mural wall is charged with an inescutcheon parted per chevron abased, above Vert two salt hooks Argent in saltire, beneath Or hammer and mallet Sable in saltire.
Meaning:
The arms display a city wall, to stress the city character of Salzgitter. The two ears and the furnace symbolise the agriculture and industry respectively. The charges of the inescutcheon are referring to mining of salt, represented by the hooks and iron, represented by hammer and mallet.
Source: Stadler 1970, p.69; Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003 and Ralf Hartemink's webpage
Santiago Dotor, 18 Dec 2001

Flag and banner were approved on 3 March 1951 The arms were approved on 24 January 1951.
Jörg Majewski, 27 Aug 2007


Bad Borough

Bad Flag

[Bad borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 17 June 2019

It is a white over yellow over red horizontal tricolour with centred arms.
Source: this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

Bad Coat of Arms

Shield parted per fess, above barry and sinister bendy of dark and light lozenges Gules, a pyramid Or with a human head proper at its top, beneath Argent two salt hooks Sable in saltire.
Meaning:
Bad (English: spa) is actually the old urban core of Salzgitter. The arms of the borough are a new edition of the arms of Salzgitter, which was in official use from the 18th century until 1850. It was rediscovered during restorations in 1982. Those arms had been slightly different, parted per fess of Gules and Argent, above head and pyramid Argent and beneath the salt hooks Gules. They had been based on the arms, used by the local council of Salzliebenhall, today being part of the city. It was also depicted on a bell of the local Church of St. Mary and St. James from 1750. Head and pyramid are either alluding to the beheaded St. John the Baptist with the head placed onto a bowl or to St. James, patron saint of the local church since 1481 and later dedicated to St. Mary and St.James.
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.32-33 and Altes Wappen von Salzgitter-Bad, Salzgitter Zeitung vom 10. April 2008, S. 24.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 9 April 2008.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019


Beddingen Borough

Beddingen Flag


[Beddingen borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 28 Aug 2007

It is a white flag with green horizontal edges. The arms are in the white stripe and slightly shifted to the hoist.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 28 Aug 2007

Beddingen Banner

[Beddingen borough banner] 8:3 image by Jörg Majewski, 28 Aug 2007

It is a white banner with green vertical edges. The arms are in the white stripe and shifted to the top.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 28 Aug 2007

Beddingen Coat of Arms

[Beddingen borough CoA] image by Jörg Majewski, 28 Aug 2007

Shield Vert, an anchor Argent with its pole being a sword.
Meaning:
The sword is alluding to the fact that Beddingen had been seat of a central court from 1402 or earlier until 1807. The anchor is representing the local harbour, the biggest inland port of Lower Saxony, and the Salzgitter Branch Channel. The colours are representing water (white) and agriculture (green).
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.34
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 18 May 1999.
Jörg Majewski, 28 Aug 2007


Bleckenstedt Borough

Bleckenstedt Flag


[Bleckenstedt borough flag] 3:5 image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

It is an armourial flag (banner of arms).
Source: this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

Bleckenstedt Coat of Arms

Shield Azure, a chevron Or, flanked by three 6-point stars Or ordered 2:1.
Meaning:
The arms had been the family arms of the Lords of Blikenstede, local rulers from the 12th until the 14th century. The chevron is symbolising a roof and the suffix "-stedt", meaning location or home. The stars are reminding on three serious devastations between 1251 and 1603 and the threefold rebuilding of the village. The colours blue and yellow are those of Braunschweig, as Bleckenstedt belonged to the Duchy of Braunschweig and later to the State of Braunschweig.
Source: Salzgitter Zeitung vom 29. Februar 2008, S. 27.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 26 February 2008.
Klaus-Michael Schneider,


Calbecht Borough

Calbecht Flag


[Calbecht borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 29 Aug 2007

It is a white flag with green horizontal edges. The arms are in the white stripe and slightly shifted to the hoist.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 29 Aug 2007

Calbecht Banner

[Calbecht borough banner] 8:3 image by Jörg Majewski, 29 Aug 2007

It is a white banner with green vertical edges. The arms are in the white stripe and shifted to the top.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 29 Aug 2007

Calbecht Coat of Arms

[Calbecht borough CoA] image by Jörg Majewski, 29 Aug 2007

Shield Vert, a pale wavy Argent, in canton an imperial globe Argent.
Meaning:
The pale wavy is representing the name giving Kaltbach (=cold creek). The globe is reminding on the fact that the oldest local farm in the village as appendix of the royal palace of Werla had been an imperial fiefdom. The green colour is symbolising groves and agriculture.
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.34
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 22 January 1998.
Jörg Majewski, 29 Aug 2007


Lesse Borough

Lesse Flag


[Lesse borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 31 Aug 2007

The flag is parted per saltire of yellow and blue with centred arms.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 31 Aug 2007

Lesse Banner

[Lesse borough banner] 8:3 image by Jörg Majewski,, 31 Aug 2007

The banner is parted per saltire of blue and yellow with centred arms.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 31 Aug 2007

Lesse Coat of Arms

[Lesse borough CoA] image by Jörg Majewski, 31 Aug 2007

Shield Or, a pile wavy Azure, charged with a bulrush Or with two leaves.
Meaning:
The colours are those of Braunschweig, to which the village historically belonged. The pile wavy is representing Sangebach, a local creek. The bulrush is alluding to the name of the municipality, meaning "creek with reed plants". It is also alluding to the people's will to survive. The locals had to rebuild the village several times between 1492 and 1648. The two leaves are representing Lesse proper and Nienstedt.
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.37
Klaus-Michael Schneider,18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 5 September 2001
Jörg Majewski, 31 Aug 2007


Reppner Borough

Reppner Flag


[Reppner borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 1 Sep 2007

It is a red-yellow horizontal bicolour. The coat of arms without shield is in the canton.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 1 Sep 2007

Reppner Banner

[Reppner borough banner] 8:3 image by Jörg Majewski, 1 Sep 2007

It is a red-yellow vertical bicolour. The coat of arms without shield is in the canton.
Source: this online catalogue

Reppner Coat of Arms

[Reppner borough CoA] image by Jörg Majewski, 1 Sep 2007

Shield Gules, an agricultural crown Or.
Meaning:
Reppner had been a village under direct royal rule about 1000 years ago. The crown here had grain ears instead of gemstones in order to allude to the importance of agriculture. The colours had been those of the Dukes of Braunschweig and the Bishops of Hildesheim as well. The dukes had been the souvereigns and the bishops owned most of the local real estates.
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.39
Klaus-Michael Schneider,18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 10 March 1989, flag and banner are in use since 2003.
Jörg Majewski, 1 Sep 2007


Thiede Borough

Thiede Flag


[Thiede borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski,, 2 Sep 2007

It is an armourial flag (banner of arms).
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski,, 2 Sep 2007

Thiede Banner

[Thiede borough banner] 8:3 image by Jörg Majewski,, 2 Sep 2007

It is a banner of arms.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski,, 2 Sep 2007

Thiede Coat of Arms

[Thiede borough CoA] mage by Jörg Majewski,, 2 Sep 2007

Shield Vert, a linden leaf Argent, surrounded by a lozenge embattled of the same.
Meaning:
The embattled lozenge is symbolising local fortifications, especially Pascheburg Castle from the 13th century. The leaf is alluding to a local court, which in the Medieval usually had been in session beneath a linden tree. It is also alluding to Lindenberg settlement at the eastern edge of the village, meaning mountain of lindens. The green colour is symbolising agriculture
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.40
Christopher Southworth, 4 Sep 2007 and Klaus-Michael Schneider,18 June 2019

The arms were proposed on10 July 1989 by Arbeitskreis Thiede e.V. and adopted by the local council without official approval. Flag and banner are in use since 10 April 1991.
Jörg Majewski,, 2 Sep 2007


Üfingen Borough

Üfingen Flag


[Üfingen borough flag] 3:5 image by Jörg Majewski, 3 Sep 2007

It is an armourial flag (banner of arms).
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 3 Sep 2007

Üfingen Banner

[Üfingen borough banner] 8:3 image by Jörg Majewski, 3 Sep 2007

It is a banner of arms.
Source: this online catalogue
Jörg Majewski, 3 Sep 2007

Üfingen Coat of Arms

[Üfingen borough CoA] image by Jörg Majewski, 3 Sep 2007

Shield parted per pale of Gules and Or, a throughout stem of linden in pale with one leaf on either side in counterchanged colours.
Meaning:
The colours had been those of the Dukes of Braunschweig and the Bishops of Hildesheim as well. The two leafs are symbolising Üfingen proper and Nortenhof, the stem the common future of both parts.
Source: Arnold Rabbow: "Neues Braunschweigisches Wappenbuch", Braunschweiger Zeitungsverlag 2003; p.40
Klaus-Michael Schneider,18 June 2019

The arms were adopted by a public meeting without official approval on 13 November 2002, flag and banner are in use since 8 January 2003.
Jörg Majewski, 3 Sep 2007


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