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El Cerro de Andévalo (Municipality, Andalusia, Spain)

Last modified: 2016-12-20 by ivan sache
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Flag of El Cerro de Andévalo - Image from the Símbolos de Huelva website, 20 August 2016


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Presentation of El Cerro de Andévalo

The municipality of El Cerro de Andévalo (2,495 inhabitants in 2015; 28,670 ha; municipal website) is located 80 km north of Huelva.

El Cerro de Andévalo was originally part of a big territory (Campo y Cerro de Andévalo) granted by King Ferdinand III the Saint on 15 June 1251 to the Council of Seville. The re-settlement of the area was soon organized, with the establishment of farms and villages protected by castles. In 1387, El Cerro de Andévalo and La Nava de Andévalo were reportedly depopulated. Forty years later, however, El Cerro was reported as a significant council managing a jail. The village was destroyed and depopulated once again in 1479 during the war between Castile and Portugal.
A census reported in 1502 lists in El Cerro "220 tax-paying households with widows and orphans". In the 16th century, the villagers of El Cerro went several times to the court to defend their rights and settle territorial disputes with their neighbours. Municipal Ordinances were published in the 18th century.

The first mining concessions were granted in El Cerro in 1859. Manganese mostly, but also copper, antimony and lead were extracted. The mining estate of Poblado was established in 1855-1867 by the Compagnie des Mines de Cuivre d'Huelva, which extracted copper form the mine of the same name, and completed from 1900 onwards by the Sociedad Francesa de Piritas de Huelva. Made of three blocks of houses, the village could house 18 households; when manpower increased, the houses were divided to accommodate 40 households. The mine was continuously exploited until 1985.

Ivan Sache, 20 August 2016


Symbols of El Cerro de Andévalo

The flag (photo) of El Cerro de Andévalo, adopted on 17 December 1998 by the Municipal Council and validated on 11 May 2000 by the Royal Academy of Córdoba, is prescribed by Decree No. 336, adopted on 27 June 2000 by the Government of Andalusia and published on 20 July 2000 in the official gazette of Andalusia, No. 83, pp. 11,719-11,720 (text). This was confirmed by a Resolution adopted on 30 November 2004 by the Directorate General of the Local Administration and published on 20 December 2004 in the official gazette of Andalusia, No. 246, pp. 28,986-29,002 (text).
The flag is described as follows:

Flag: Rectangular, in proportions 11 x 18, made of three vertical stripes, the first and the second in length 1/8 of the flag's length and the third 6/8, red, blue and white, respectively, charged in the center with the local coat of arms.

The coat of arms of El Cerro de Andévalo, adopted on 28 March 1995 by the Municipal Council and revised on 25 March 1997 as recommended on 28 September 1995 by the Royal Academy of Córdoba, is prescribed by Decree No. 257, adopted on 4 November 1997 by the Government of Andalusia and published on 27 November 1997 in the official gazette of Andalusia, No. 138, p. 14,063 (text). This was confirmed by a Resolution adopted on 30 November 2004 by the Directorate General of the Local Administration and published on 20 December 2004 in the official gazette of Andalusia, No. 246, pp. 28,986-29,002 (text).
The coat of arms is described as follows:

Coat of arms: Azure a tower or surmonted by a mast with two balls all or surrounded by two trees argent outlined sable. The shield surmounted by a Royal Spanish crown closed.

The coat of arms was first proposed on 19 October 1989 by Juan José Antequera.
A document dated 1480, kept in the Municipal Archives of Seville, shows the yellow wax seal of the Council of El Cerro de Andˇvalo featuring a tower surmounted by two spheres and surrounded by two trees. Arms were designed in the 1950s, made of an oval shield azure with a hill (cerro) ensigned with a holly oak, the shield surrounded by a ribbon in the national colours and surmounted by a Royal crown closed. In other versions of the arms, the ribbon is inscribed with the name of the place.
The first proposal was "Per pale, 1. Azure two caldrons checky or and gules handled by seven snake's heads vert a bordure compony gules a castle or and argent a lion purpure 7 and 7, 2a. Azure a Muslim tower or ensigned by two balls surrounded by two trees argent outlined sable, 2b. A tree proper on a hill vert issuant a boar passant or outlined sable armed argent. The shield surmounted by a Royal crown closed." The proposal could not be approved by the municipality before the adoption on 28 March 1995 of the Decree allowing the municipalities to adopt arms.
The Royal Academy of Córdoba rejected the proposal. The number of quarters was deemed excessive, the Decree on the local symbols explicitly prohibiting the adoption of arms with more than two quarters, for the sake of simplicity.
[Juan José Antequera. Principios de transmisibilidad en las heráldicas officiales de Sevilla, Córdoba y Huelva]

Ivan Sache, 20 August 2016