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Yigo, Guam

Last modified: 2011-02-26 by ian macdonald
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The municipality of Yigo (19,474 inhabitants in 2000; 9,060 ha) is the northernmost of the 19 municipalities of the island.

Quoting the "Guam Portal" website:
"The village of Yigo is the second most populated village on Guam with more than 19,000 residents, and one of the fastest growing. The word Yigo is derived from “yugu”, which is the frame placed on the neck of a carabao. Yigo is the northernmost village and was previously a farm area, producing an abundance of coffee, pineapples, oranges and tangerines. Yigo has a rich history. There are several identified spots where General Obata, the commander of the Imperial Japanese forces, made his last stand against the attacking American forces. Chagui’an, Yigo is a spot where 45 men and young boys were killed by the Japanese military soon after the landing of the U.S. forces. The Chagui’an massacre site has been nominated for the National Register of Historic Places. On April 12, 2004 a cross was constructed to memorialize the death of those who lost their lives."
http://www.aroundguam.com/yigo-guam - "Arond Guam" website

As reported by David Mercado Jr., "Northern Weekly", 21 July 2010, Yigo could soon have a flag.
"The northern village of Yigo is in the process of designing its very own village flag, thanks to the efforts of the Mayors' Council of Guam. The council, along with the Guam Visitors Bureau is working with Grafix Design Media as part of the "We Are Guam" campaign to design flags that help emphasize the history and heritage of each village.

The idea of the Yigo flag came from a man that used to volunteer at the Yigo mayor's office, says Mayor Robert Lizama. "He used to also work for the Boy Scout troops in Yigo back in 1997, and he asked me about the idea of a village flag," says Lizama. "But after he left the island, the idea of the flag was left untouched."
[...]

One symbol to put on the flag hangs on the wall behind Lizama's office desk. The Yigo logo, as he calls it, has been used for almost four years. "I still want to use this logo," says Lizama as he points to it. "You can actually see this logo in many of the mayoral business cars, and also chairs that are used for many events in Yigo.
[The logo is shown on two photos attached to the article.]

Several symbols for use on the flag are still being debated. The carabao, pineapple, coconut crab, deer, carabao, the ifit tree and coffee are several of the symbols that give pride to the northern village. "The carabao is symbolic because it was used as transportation back then to send off goods and our people to Hagåtña," Lizama says in reference the acres of agricultural land found in Yigo. "The yoke, which is the device attached to the neck of the carabao in order to pull a cart is called 'yugu.' That's a theory on how Yigo got its name, which is why one idea is to put the picture of the carabao in the flag." Yigo is also known for growing pineapple and coffee, and for having many deer and ifit trees.

Last Wednesday, the Mayors' Council looked at several flag proposals. The mayors will again review flag designs next month. "We want to have the best possible icon on the flag but because there are so many icons that define Yigo, it's hard to decide," he says.
[...]

Other mayors are also looking at flag designs to represent their own villages.
[...]"

http://www.guampdn.com/article/20100721/COMMUNITIES/7210330
Ivan Sache, 10 August 2010