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Lumbarda (Municipality, Dubrovnik-Neretva County, Croatia)

Last modified: 2017-02-19 by ivan sache
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[Municipality flag]

Flag of Lumbarda - Image by Željko Heimer, 25 August 2012

See also:

Presentation of Lumbarda

The municipality of Lumbarda (1,221 inhabitants in 2001) is located at the south-eastern end of the island of Korčula, 130 km north-west of Dubrovnik.
The region was settled in the 4th century BC, as a Greek colony from which tombstones are preserved; the most notable is a psefizma, an inscribed stone tablet. Since the 15th century, numerous vacation residences, fortified with towers and loopholes, have been built for the Dubrovnik and Korčula civic nobility and merchants; Lumbarda is still today an important tourist resort.
The municipality was established in 1997 by separation from the Town of Korčula.

Željko Heimer, 16 December 2006

Flag of Lumbarda

The symbols of Lumbarda are prescribed by Decision Odluka o grbu i zastavi Općine Lumbarda, adopted by the Municipality Assembly on 13 March 2012 and published on 3 August 2012 in the Municipality official gazette Službeni glasnik Općine Lumbarda, No. 3 (text).
The symbols were approved by the Ministry of Administration in 2012.

The flag is in proportions 1:2, blue with the coat of arms, bordered in yellow, in the middle.

The Municipality Statutes Statut Općine Lumbarda, adopted on 23 April 1998 by the Municipality Council and published on 30 December 1998 in the County official gazette Službeni glasnik Dubrovačko-neretvanske županije, No. 9., include "blazons" (that is, descriptions) of the coat of arms and flag. The wording was complex, claiming it is "a thought-out system of symbols and colours" listing them: white (the psefizma stone tablet), blue (sea and sky), golden-yellow ( the sun and the grk grapevine), green (pine and olive). The flag was described as "thought out system of blue and golden-yellow".
Upon my inquiry to what the symbols would look like, the municipal administration replied that they actually had no idea and that the actual graphic representation of the symbols was not done yet. Seemingly, they just listed out what they thought they wanted, but without any idea of how it would actually look like. Of course, such a "wishlist" was damn hard to fulfil; obviously, after a long process, they had to settle with quite different symbols that are able to say mostly the same but are blazonable.

Željko Heimer, 25 August 2012

Coat of arms of Lumbarda

[Municipality arms]

Coat of arms of Lumbarda - Image by Željko Heimer, 25 August 2012

The coat of arms is "Azure a Corinthian column capital argent in base branches of olive and grapevine or".

Željko Heimer, 25 August 2012

Ceremonial flag of Lumbarda

[Municipality ceremonial flag]

Ceremonial flag of Lumbarda - Image by Željko Heimer, 25 August 2012

The ceremonial flag is a blue gonfalon with the coat of arms in the centre, the name of the municipality above and grapevine branches below.

Željko Heimer, 25 August 2012

Table flag of Lumbarda


Table flag of Lumbarda - Image by Željko Heimer, 24 August 2016

The table flag is of the same general design as the ceremonial flag, but in simplified shape.

Željko Heimer & Ivan Grbac, 24 August 2016

Republic of Lumbarda

[Republic flag]

Flag of the Republic of Lumbarda - Image by Ivan Sache, 2 December 2012

Like in many other places in Croatia, during the week preceding the Ash Wednesday, the ceremonial "independence" of the town is proclaimed as part of the carnival festivities, and a local republic is being acted; usually, the local Mayor is "make-believe" publicly deposed and has to grant the "keys of the town" to masked actors. As part of the 2009 carnival, the "independent" Republic of Lumbarda was being played and a flag was devised for it.

If you compare it with the actual determenations of the Statutes, it is very much the most sensible representation to what the writer of the Statutes might have been meaning. The white chief of the "coat of arms" represents the psefizma tablet, in the chief is inscribed "Let it be with [good] luck", which are the opening words of the original 4th century inscription. The inverted embowed pall represents the existing path to the beaches of Lumbarda, with all the other symbols mentioned in the description of the Statutes, the bunch of grapes, blue, green etc.

Željko Heimer, 16 June 2011