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BiPride flag

Last modified: 2015-06-06 by randy young
Keywords: sexual orientation | bisexual | page (michael) | trillium | tricolor: horizontal (magenta-lavender-blue) |
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BiPride flag
image by António Martins, 10 May 2000

See also:

Description and origin of the flag

Bisexuals are folks who like to play with either men or women.
Al Kirsch, 3 February 2001

The flag itself is a horizontal tricolor of magenta, lavender, and royal blue (PMS colors: top stripe 226, middle 258, bottom 286), in proportions 2:1:2. The overall proportions of the flag do not seem to be fixed, but instead are of the commercially available proportions, either 2:3 or 3:5. The designer, Michael Page, described the history and symbolism of the flag to me in personal correspondence as follows:
The BiPride Flag was unveiled at the BiCafe's first Anniversary Party on Dec. 5th 1998. In that short period of time, the tri-colored flag has been referred to by Dr. Fritz Klein as being "A most important new Bi symbol" in the BiNet USA newsletter dated Winter 1998. […] The symbolism, Steve, is simply an evolution of the Pink and Blue triangles [an earlier symbol of the bisexual community — SK]. These triangles often overlap with purple being the resultant color. I designed the layout of the flag to reflect that overlap, because to me, the Lavender represents "me", a "Middle Person." I had a prototype developed and currently have over a thousand BiPride Flags in various shapes and sizes. Of all the past symbols for the bi movement or bisexuality, none were flaggable on a mass scale. To me, this new BiPride Flag will give Bi People the visibility necessary to invoke the presence we have at many GLBT [stands for "gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered" — SK] events, but never had managed to effectively manifest in the past.
The flag is trademarked, and Michael Page is allowing us to post it. I believe we should note this on the page, together with the address of the BiCafe so that those who wish to use it may contact the proper authority for permission.
Steve Kramer, 16 and 18 March 1999

The trillium symbol

The BiCafe adds a relatively new symbol that resembles a trillium to represent bisexuals.
Steve Kramer, 16 March 1999