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Lincoln, Nebraska (U.S.)

Lancaster County

Last modified: 2019-12-24 by rick wyatt
Keywords: lincoln | nebraska | lancaster county |
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[Flag of Lincoln, Nebraska] 2:3 image(s) by permission of David B. Martucci
image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright.



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Current Flag

Text and image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright. Image(s) from American City Flags by permission of David B. Martucci.

Design

Lincoln’s flag has a medium blue field of 4 by 6 units. In its center appears the state capitol, a tower in white. The tower overlaps an incomplete red ring, 2.5 units in diameter, so that the ring appears to run behind it very near its top, and then continues in a circle on both sides until about 5 and 7 o’clock, where it is obscured by a yellow ear of corn with green leaves on either side and congruent to the circle. Between the ears of corn in the center at the base of the tower is a sheaf of yellow wheat. The distance from the top of the tower to the base of the wheat sheaf is 3.8 units. A second red ring, one unit in diameter, is within the larger ring, and placed behind the tower so that its top edge is about half way up the tower, and thus only a portion of the ring is visible. Extending from this ring to the larger ring are four red rays, one each at about 2, 4, 8 and 10 o’clock. In white block letters on the larger ring, following its curve clockwise, are CITY OF on the hoist side and LINCOLN on the fly side.
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Symbolism

The white tower represents Lincoln’s role as the capital of Nebraska. The red circles come from the insignia of the University of Nebraska, and represent education and culture; the corn and wheat symbolize Lincoln as an agricultural center.
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Selection

A flag design competition was sponsored by the chamber of commerce, restricted to residents of the city. The prize was $50. Five judges chose the final design from among more than 50 entries.
Flag adopted: 14 September 1931 (official).
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Designer

Winner of the competition on 2 September 1931, Mrs. J. E. Fiselman.
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

More about the Flag

The contest for a flag design was inspired by a gift from members of the Rotary Club of Lincoln, England, who presented a flag of their city to Lincoln, Nebraska, during a visit in May 1928. Various groups in the city discussed the need to have a similar emblem, which resulted in the chamber of commerce competition. Frank D. Tomson, chairman of the chamber’s flag committee, presented the flag to Acting Mayor Blair in a ceremony at city hall on 29 October 1932. In his remarks, Tomson said that a new Lincoln flag had also been presented to the city of Lincoln, England. In a further burst of grandiloquent rhetoric, Tomson exhorted, “It should find a place in every home within this city and be displayed as a hospitable welcome whenever visitors in numbers from other parts enter our gates.”
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

The City of Lincoln (236,146 inhabitants; 82.75 sq. miles) is located in Lancaster County, in south-eastern Nebraska. On 29 July 1867, the three commissioners appointed by the Legislature decided that the capital of the new state of Nebraska, called Lincoln, would be located on the site of Lancaster, a tiny settlement of 30 inhabitants, near Salt Basin in Lancaster County. This choice was the result of pressure to move the capital from Omaha, which was the capital of the Territory. Lincoln was incorporated on April 7, 1869 as a village. On March 18, 1871 it was reorganized into a Second Class City with its own charter as provided by the state legislature for cities between 1,500 and 15,000 population.

Source: www.lincoln.ne.gov/both/glance1.htm
Ivan Sache, 3 March 2007


Seal

[Municipal seal] image located by Paul Bassinson, 3 October 2019

Source: https://lincoln.ne.gov
Paul Bassinson, 3 October 2019